Untitled RSS

Archive

Dec
9th
Tue
permalink

Elie and his fellow inmates in Buna have been relocated to another concentration camp, stemming from the apparent closeness of Russian soldiers. The journey is as anti-Semitic and graphic as their time in the horrid camp. People die and freeze, the Nazis lose even more of what little heart they had; forcing the relocaters to spend three days in a shed with no food nor beverages. As they leave the shed, the dead stay behind and the living board a train. Cruel and heartless Naziists throw coins and bread onto the train, watching with sordid and heartless glee as the beaten and famished prisoners forsake their lugubrious attitudes to find food. This is very disturbing to Elie, especially when he sees and elderly man trampled to death. Once again, the writing is of superior quality. This is a frightening and very disturbing book that is never too dramatic and never glosses over the horrors of the Holocaust and genocide in general. No real human can read this book without deriving some form of hatred for the Nazis.

Nov
26th
Wed
permalink

The book is now becoming very gory and disturbing, but true-to-life with regards to the attrocities of the Holocaust. Elie and his fellow prisoners still dor forced running and remain in starvation. Heartless concentration camp guards beat and taunt the victims. Elie and other prisoners are deported to another concentration camp, where he is beaten to bleeding point by a violently insane prisoner. A German-speaking French girl helps to soothe elie’s wounds. A guard then forces Elie to give up his gold filling by forcing his military-ignorant father to undergo rigorous marching. Elie and his fellow victims try to not lose hope, (one victim claims that the Holocaust is testing the loyalty of the Jewish people to God) although Elie is cynical about God’s justice. The writing is still very good, and has a layer of disturbingly accurate details, which enhance the quality all the more. Night is aptly named because such terrible circumstances seem only possible in the night, during a nightmare.

Nov
23rd
Sun
permalink

I have read more of Night. Elie, his family, and friends were deported to ghettos then to Auschiwtz. Elie repetitively describes his loss of trust in God. “Never shall I forget those moments which murdered my God” (32). Elie tells of how his family would nervously await deportment, of the tautness of the train, and the terror of Auschwitz. The novel’s writing is somber and quite good, luring me to read, to sympathize with Elie and his comrades. Some people may deem this novel graphic (how the prisoners were forced to run in the cold, naked, picking up ill-fitting garments from the SS, and getting painful haircuts). I think the graphicness enchances the emotional connection people feel with this novel, and the details are not hyperbole, which adds to the creidiblity of these accounts.

Nov
21st
Fri
permalink

Night by Elie Wiesel

I am reading Night by Elie Wiesel, which is a memoir of his expierences during the Holocaust. The book starts out in Sighet, with a man named Moshe the Beadle. Later, Moshe witnesses the brutal deaths of Jews, losing his genial persona. Elie narrates the novel with a sad tone, amplifying the circumstances during the Holocaust. While I am still in the mere beginning of the memoir, I can already see the expertise with which this book is written and I am interested to see happens next. (I am up to the point where the Jews are being relocated to a brick factory by the Nazis).